Archive for December, 2009

Knowing what to look for

December 31, 2009

Review of Mosby’s Pathology for Massage Therapists, by Salvo and Anderson.

In chapter one it tells you what types of diseases are out there and which ones are very contagious. It tells you that age, gender, stress, etc. can effect you for disease. It tells you ways that disease, viruses, and other bacteria is spread or transferred. And then it gives you guidelines as a massage therapist of how to protect yourself and your clients by being sanitary. Chapter one had a lot of useful info just to let you know what to look for.

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Alternative Therapies and Conditions to Prognosis

December 29, 2009

Pathology books and courses do a terrific job of documenting all of the scientific causes and explanations of various diseases. You can learn why one type of cancer will spread throughout the body while another remains in it’s original origin. What is not discussed or accounted for are the numerous factors that make humans different from each other and sometimes unexplainable actions. There are many people who respond favorably to unique treatments. The mind and emotions also have a huge impact on a patient’s prognosis. There is also research that supports the benefits of massage on certain disorders and disabilities. Sensory input, such as massage, can affect motor output such as improved motor control and movements.

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A Therapist’s Dilemma

December 29, 2009

A few days ago I was listening to a conversation between two therapists, a physical therapist and a speech therapist. They were discussing the moral and ethical implications of treating a patient with a brain tumor or other similar incurable diseases. They were agonizing over what to tell a patient who is reporting for hours of therapy when they were near death. The speech therapist argued that she often wanted to tell patients to go home and enjoy their last few weeks with friends and family rather than waste precious hours in multiple therapies each day. It made a lot of sense to me. And then I read a short blurb in the health section of the Washington Post. A man had written in saying that he had been diagnosed with the Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome and that he is still alive more than thirty years later. Three decades is much longer than the medically accepted life expectancy. So here is the dilemma as a therapist: how do you decide what is hopeful and preparing your patients for their futures and what is fantastical thought that should be replaced by practical steps to ensure maximum quality of life. I have a feeling that it is one of those questions that will never be fully answered but must be addressed anew each time such a patient comes under our care.

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Water Intake

December 24, 2009

The definition of ‘drink plenty of water’ following a massage is what I request all my clients to do. A half ounce of water per pound of body weight, as suggested in the text is a lot of water but it does flush the body of toxins released from their massage. Personally I find it difficult to drink that much but it does promote frequent breaks from a desk job which in turn reduces muscle tension and stiffness. Increase water also helps improve one’s mental task abilities by avoiding dehydration and again mentally taking a break from a challenging mental task. I’ve been told if you don’t drink anything until you are thirsty, you are already dehydrated. So, eat, drink and be merry this holiday season, take alot of potty breaks to keep hydrated, clear your thinking, prevent stiff and tense muscles and…keep your blood sugar down to prevent diabetes or a diabetic spike.

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Cancer

December 22, 2009

Review of Mosby’s Pathology for Massage Therapists, by Salvo and Anderson.

I have heard the different names to describe cancer but didn’t understand that the naming convention was based on the type of diseased tissue. Are uterine fibroids a benign type of cancer?

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Respiratory Disease

December 22, 2009

Review of Mosby’s Pathology for Massage Therapists, by Salvo and Anderson.

I don’t understand the reference of COPD ‘pink puffers’ – predominantly emphysema and ‘blue bloaters’ predominantly bronchitis. Is the pink referring to pink faces due to lack of oxygen exchange and the blue to coughing until your winded?

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Graves Disease

December 22, 2009

Review of Mosby’s Pathology for Massage Therapists, by Salvo and Anderson.

The book states that a client with Graves disease should not have their neck and throat massaged. Does this include the back of the neck/occipital ridge area? I can understand the SCM avoidance since it is closer to the throat area.

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Reproductive Conditions

December 21, 2009

Review of Mosby’s Pathology for Massage Therapists, by Salvo and Anderson.

As a massage therapist, I never plan to view any of these diseases or disorders. Careful draping is critical. It is good personal info to know. This chapter seriously impresses upon me the need for good hygiene with my table, linens, hand sanitizers, etc.

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Gastrointestinal Patholoy

December 21, 2009

Review of Mosby’s Pathology for Massage Therapists, by Salvo and Anderson.

It really appears that any abdominal issue would be contraindicated simply because of any additional pressure could exacerbate the problem. I know I don’t want to be on a massage table, undressed if I have ANY digestive issue going on…how fast can I dress or wrap up to get to the restroom!

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Review of Mosby’s Pathology for Massage Therapists, by Salvo and Anderson

December 21, 2009

Within Dr. Johnson’s class, I especially appreciated the info on the opportunistic diseases associated with AIDS. I’m really ignorant in that area and living in Los Angeles I might see it more that in a small town in Kansas. The PPT presentations are great anat/phys reviews that help me better understand the descriptions of the diseases.

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Nervous System

December 21, 2009

Review of Mosby’s Pathology for Massage Therapists, by Salvo and Anderson.

If I were younger and taking this course, I would not relate to these disorders and diseases as much as I do now that I’m ‘pushing’ 60. I read these symptoms and see them in myself, family, and friends. I appreciate the section emphasizing the care when working with the visually impaired. Know the emotion aspect of the diseases is also very useful when working with affected clients.

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Musculoskeletal System

December 21, 2009

Review of Mosby’s Pathology for Massage Therapists, by Salvo and Anderson.

Understanding the abnormal physiological processes and anatomical structures really impresses one to follow the prescribed treatment indications and especially the contraindications. This book’s photo and diagrammed examples are terrific.

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