Archive for February 15th, 2010

Malignancy

February 15, 2010

Review of Mosby’s Pathology for Massage Therapists, by Salvo and Anderson.

In today’s society, everyone knows someone who has been directly or indirectly affected by at least one type of cancer- the uncontrollable growth of abnormal cells that form a tumor. It is the second highest cause of death in the United States, second to heart disease. Incidences of different kinds of cancer vary by age, gender, ethnicity and location (Salvo, 312).

Page 324 discussed the general guidelines for massage therapists when working with cancer patients. Although many of us are familiar with cancer, there are certain precautions and considerations that need to be taken into account when working with a client with cancer. I feel that one of the most important points was the idea of being educated about the type of cancer and the treatments which the client is undergoing. Overall, discussing the client’s needs and level of comfort with the massage is crucial for an effective treatment plan. “The massage therapist needs to ask the client exactly what symptoms and quality of those symptoms the client is experiencing each time the client receives a massage treatment so that the massage therapist can tailor the treatment based on the client’s needs.” Also of importance is accepting the client’s appearance and remaining professional and considerate, as this is respectful to the client and what he/she is going through. These considerations remain true for all of the various cancers presented, and thus I felt were the most pertinent part of the chapter.

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Reproductive Conditions

February 15, 2010

Massage can be a highly effective method of relief for premenstrual syndrome, endometriosis, and dysmenorrhea, as long as the therapist is careful to first ask the client about the location and severity of the pain. Different positions can provide more comfort during massage, and these various positions should be tried with the client depending on their pain level and location. Gentle massage can help a client who is experiencing these conditions relax.

Also, with the prevalence of sexually transmitted diseases, it is important that massage therapists are aware of the various pathologies of the reproductive system. Some can be contagious and also cause pain for the client during massage. Massage can be contraindicated until the client has fully recovered, but some conditions can also be life-threatening. Also, some pathologies only affect the reproductive system, while others can have consequences on the entire body and other systems. This is why, although not directly affected by massage, therapists must know and understand the reproductive system.

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Nervous System Pathology

February 15, 2010

Review of Mosby’s Pathology for Massage Therapists, by Salvo and Anderson.

Chapter 5– This chapter was about nervous pathologies. The beginning of the chapter started with an overview of the nervous system. This was a nice review. It broke the nervous system down into three basic functions: Sensory, integrative, and motor. It mentioned that the spinal chord and brain make up the central nervous system and that all the remaining nervous tissue outside of that is part of the Central nervous system. The review section also discusses the autonomic nervous system and the parasympathetic nervous system. On page 146 the text talks about some of general manifestations of nervous system diseases. Some example include, dizziness, tremors, and loss of coordination. Then the chapter includes many pathologies from pages 147 -168. This chapter touches on disorders such as multiple sclerosis, cerebal palsy as well as mood disorders such as depression. For many of the diseases massage could be done and was often recommended depending on the pathology being discussed. Sometimes the massage therapist needed to obtain clearance from the primary health provider prior to performing any treatment. The one disease I learned the most about was shingles. I did not realize this is neurological. It didn’t touch on in much in chapter 5, but referred me back to chapter 3. After doing additional research I learned how it was neurological and how it "hibernates" for years.

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Assessment

February 15, 2010

Review of Mosby’s Pathology for Massage Therapists, by Salvo and Anderson.

There was a lot of information in this chapter on client intake and health assessment. The first portion talks about documentation, informed consent forms charting, and assessing the patient’s treatment. I found this portion very interesting because when I’ve done some shadowing in the field I want to enter (occupational therapy), the therapists all used the documentation detailed here. It was nice to see some of the questions that a massage therapists would ask a client prior to the massage (pages 30-35). I learned the importance of subjective and objective data when assessing a client. A large part of this chapter was actually looking at objective data a massage therapist might collect from looking at a patient. For example, looking at skin color, skin condition, and skin pigmentation would be part of an objective exam. Nail condition, breathing, posture and body structure are also important things to look at before a therapist determines how to proceed with their course of treatment. The chapter goes on to talk about many additional things to consider from skin turgor to gait. The last part of the chapter describes how to set up a treatment plan. This includes maybe setting up short-term massage goals along with long term ones for example. The therapist will be sure to assess the client’s needs while coming up with a treatment plan. I learned a lot from this chapter. I feel that treatment plans are a big part of occupational therapy as well as massage therapy! I didn’t know the two were similar in this regard.

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Infection Control

February 15, 2010

Review of Mosby’s Pathology for Massage Therapists, by Salvo and Anderson.

I have had a lot of the content in chapter one in previous classes. However, there are a couple things I learned/relearned. I knew a little about carcinomas but I didn’t know about oncogenes and oncoviruses. It says in the text that oncogenes are, "cancer causing genes"(pg 5). It goes on to explain that scientists aren’t exactly sure how these genes are activated. This part of the text also talks about oncoviruses. These oncoviruses cause cells to divide abnormally. One example that was given in the book was the human papillomavirus. A good deal of the chapter dealt with risk factors and the types of diseases. Some of the types of diseases include: metabolic, infectious, genetic, degenerative, deficiencies, cancer and autoimmune. Some of the risk factors for developing a disease include a person’s age, their genetics, their lifestyle, their environment, stress levels, and their gender. The chapter also noted the different types agents of disease which were bacteria, fungi, protozoa, and viruses. The definition of a pathogen is, "a living biologic agent capable of causing disease." The definitions of each of these are found on pages 8-10. In addition the chapter went on to discuss modes of transmission. Modes of transmission were split into two types: direct physical contact and indirect physical contact. Types of direct physical contact include pathogens entering via mucous membranes, intact skin, or broken skin. Types of indirect physical contact include pathogens entering the body via ingestion, or inhalation. This information can be found on pages 10-11. Another part of this chapter that was really important for massage therapists and the area of the medical field I want to go into is infection control. The text is very specific about proper procedures to follow to keep the therapist safe from the transmission infectious diseases. The basics include washing hands correctly, not wearing jewelry on hands or wrists, hygiene regarding finger nails, the use of clean linens (and how to clean linens), the importance of a clean uniform every day, avoiding cross contamination of lotions and liquids used during a massage session, the use of gloves when the therapist has an injury, not working when the therapist is ill, and not performing massages when the therapist is intoxicated or under the use of other substances. All of these were great reminders for people not only interested in message therapy but all forms of health care. This information was found on pages 13-15.

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