Archive for February 23rd, 2010

Endocrine pathologies

February 23, 2010

Review of Mosby’s Pathology for Massage Therapists, by Salvo and Anderson.

Chapter 6–This chapter was about endocrine pathologies. The endocrine system works with the nervous system in order to “coordinate all body systems” (page 173). The difference between the endocrine and the nervous system is that the nervous system uses nerve impulses to communicate while the endocrine system uses hormones and chemical messengers. There are two different types of glands from which hormones are released. The first is an exocrine and the second is a endocrine. In addition, the chapter pairs each hormone with the gland it comes with along with the function on pages 174-175 (Table 6-1). This was very informational and helpful in understanding the different pathologies to follow throughout the rest of the chapter. For example, when there is something wrong with the pituitary gland it can cause a variety of related diseases such as acromegaly, diabetes insipidus, hypopititarism, and hyperpituitarism. This is the same with all of the pathologies listed starting on page 176 to page 185. As in the last chapters, massage considerations were discussed. For a lot of the disorders clearance needed to be obtained from the primary physician before carrying out any massage treatment plan. One exception was in the case of the goiter. I was surprised to find that if a goiter was present on a patient it can be massaged. Goiters are sometimes found in people with graves disease. One thing I learned from this chapter was that seasonal affective disorder is placed with the endocrine pathologies. I assumed it would be with depression and bipolar disorders in the neurological chapter.

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Musculoskeletal pathologies

February 23, 2010

Review of Mosby’s Pathology for Massage Therapists, by Salvo and Anderson.

Chapter 4– This chapter was about musculoskeletal pathologies. The chapter started with a muscular system overview. This was a really nice review, since there is a lot to know regarding this system. It included material about different muscle types, the difference between voluntary and involuntary, and the different functions (movement, stabilization etc). It even goes into how a muscle fiber contracts (figure 4-4 and page 101). The beginning of this chapter also reviews bones, joints, and a little about connective tissues. The chapter goes on to talk about musculoskeletal diseases. Pages 110-135 describe different types of diseases regarding this system. Similarly to the last chapter it briefly describes the issue and then follows up with how massage therapists should treat the issue (massage consideration). In the previous chapter, the pathologic skin was usually not touched. However, in this chapter most of conditions allow for the therapist to massage the affected area. However, if the pathology caused the patient pain the therapist was advised to keep this in mind when determining the treatment plan. The text usually recommended that the therapist ask the client how painful or sensitive the area is before they proceed. Often if there was extreme inflammation, massage was discouraged until some of the swelling subsided. One of the most interesting portions of this chapter was on page 119 (figure 4-34) regarding the different types of fractures. The diagram was very informational and will help me remember all the different types of fractures in the future. All of the pictures were once again very helpful in understanding the pathology being discussed.

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Dermatological Pathologies

February 23, 2010

Review of Mosby’s Pathology for Massage Therapists, by Salvo and Anderson.

Chapter 3– This chapter is about dermatological pathologies. The whole chapter is about diseases/pathologies that occur on/under the skin. This is important to a massage therapist because it helps them determine how to go about their treatment plan. Most of the skin diseases make it so the therapist cannot massage or palpitate the affected area. This means the therapist may have to adjust his/her treatment plan. Some of the pathologies discussed include acne, athlete’s foot, a bruise, burns, cellulitis, chickenpox, contact dermatitis, corn/callus, decubitus ulcer, eczema, folliculitis, furuncle, german measles, herpes simplex, hives, ichthyosis vulgaris, impetigo, jock itch, lice, measles, onychomycosis, open wounds, paronychia, petechiae, psoriasis, ringworm, rosacea, scabies, scars, scleroderma, sebaceous cyst, seborrheic dermatitis, seborrheic keratosis, shingles, skin tags, stretch marks, thrust, wart, and xerosis. I had heard of almost all of these diseases but I learned a little more about each in this chapter. The pictures were also very helpful in understanding the disease a little more. The Chapter also distinguishes the difference between skin lesions. Some of the different kinds are macule, papule, patch, plaque, wheal, nodule and etc (found on pages 62-68). The last part of the chapter talks about different skin pigmentation issues. The ones discusses were age spots, albinism, birthmarks, chloasma, freckle, and vitiligo. I really enjoyed learning about Ichthyosis vulgaris in this chapter. In fact, I was so fascinated by this particular disease I researched it further. I also learned about the progression from a freckle to a malignant melanoma found on page 91 (figure 3-63).

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