Archive for April 15th, 2010

Cancer and Neoplasia

April 15, 2010

Review of Mosby’s Pathology for Massage Therapists, by Salvo and Anderson. Within the course of Dr. Johnson.

While reading Chapter 12, I learned about Cancer and Neoplasia. A person with cancer can benefit greatly from massage. Massage can help to relax and improve the quality of life for a cancer patient because these clients have a huge amount of stress while dealing with a life threatening disease. During treatment the body can really take a beating, so massage can help relax the muscles, and relieve stress. In the beginning cancer was totally contraindicated, but now with more study and understanding of the disease it is allowed and greatly suggested by doctors. It can also help family members of someone with cancer, to relive the stress and relax them.

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Cancer, comment

April 15, 2010

Review of Mosby’s Pathology for Massage Therapists, by Salvo and Anderson. Within the course of Dr. Johnson.

That’s a unique perspective on the epidemic. Fascinating! Chapter 12, again, started out promising enough. There are copious amounts of information in the beginning, including substantial sections on evaluating cancer patients and helping them or making them comfortable. There were, again, really good diagrams on cancer cell development, tumors, and growths of all kinds. The pathological segments were great and informative. Then, of course, and no longer to my surprise, they started to show surgically extracted tumors as well as brains. Again, if I can’t see it from the surface, why bother? I need to evaluate people for a safe treatment plan based on a visual and palpatory examination, in addition to one or more intake forms and doctor’s notes. I don’t need to see a malignant kidney tumor, or brain cancer. There’s no way for me to confirm that on a client. If anything, more graphic images ought to be considered for an index in the back of the book. Seeing those images can’t help be become a better massage therapist. It’s extra information, that may be good for those continuing into the medical field, but not as much for people who went into massage to avoid cadavers.

Original Post
March 18, 2010
Title: Cancer
Review of Mosby’s Pathology for Massage Therapists, by Salvo and Anderson. Within the course of Dr. Johnson.
Cancer is important for me to be aware of because, living in LA, skin cancer is still rising even though most people are aware of how to prevent it. This is a disturbing fact, because I worked as a lifeguard for several years, and witnessed many people being in the sun for hours on end without applying sun tan lotion. I would hate to be the person who finds evidence of cancer on a client, as I feel this is the doctor’s place to do so, as well as I do not want to be the bearer of anything but good news while in session.

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Reproductive System Pathology

April 15, 2010

Review of Mosby’s Pathology for Massage Therapists, by Salvo and Anderson. Within the course of Dr. Johnson.

While reading Chapter 11 I learned about Reproductive Conditions, Reproductive Pathologies, and Sexually Transmitted Diseases. The reproductive system is divided into two parts, primary and secondary, the primary parts are the gonads or the organs, and the secondary and the body parts involved. Endometriosis is a common pathology; it is when the growth of the lining in the uterus that starts to grow outside the uterus, it can cause a lot of pain and infertility, massage can be a good thing for a client with endometriosis because it can help them relax. Fibrocystic Breast Disease is when one or more cysts are in the breast, they are benign and common but should be watched, massage can be preformed, but laying prone can be painful, so adjust to the comfort of the client.

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Reproductive System Pathology

April 15, 2010

Review of Mosby’s Pathology for Massage Therapists, by Salvo and Anderson. Within the course of Dr. Johnson.

Chapter 11 wasn’t actually as bad as I thought it would be. This section really is relevant to massage in its information on menstruation, the aging of reproductive organs and their effect on massage and general comfort, and of course, pregnancy. In fact, the part on pregnancy massage was rather helpful. I may have to bookmark the section for its examples of side-lying technique and equipment, as well as recommendations on clients who are lactating. However, I do not believe that I will ever find a valid reason for a massage therapist, who abides by the law, to know what genital warts looks like. Sure, the pathological and treatment information is useful, but the images are unnecessary. I feel it would be more useful to show herpes outbreaks on body parts that would be visible to the therapist than that. Information was good in this chapter, but the images were just unnecessary.

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Urinary System

April 15, 2010

Review of Mosby’s Pathology for Massage Therapists, by Salvo and Anderson. Within the course of Dr. Johnson.

While reading Chapter 10 in my text book I learned about the Urinary system. The urinary system filters and gets rid if toxins in the body. Polycystic Kidney Disorder (PKD) is a common Urinary pathology, and is the most common genetic disorder, this can cause cysts and cell death it can lead to renal failure, massage can be performed only with medical release from their health care provider. Uremia is another pathology linked to the Urinary system, it is when toxic levels of urea and other wastes are in the blood because of the kidneys inability to filter correctly, this pathology also need medical clearance for the client to receive a massage.

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Urinary System Conditions

April 15, 2010

Review of Mosby’s Pathology for Massage Therapists, by Salvo and Anderson. Within the course of Dr. Johnson.

Chapter 10 killed my appetite with an efficiency that is truly awe inspiring. I can’t argue with the introduction portion of this chapter, and I fully accept that, as medical practitioners, we should have a basic and even advanced understanding of every physiological system we hear of. I cannot fault the thorough nature of that introduction. It was very informative and mostly painless. Even the pathological portion was very useful, with its contraindications and massage recommendations. But the pictures are simply unforgivable, showing bits of a person we hope to never see, in some very poor shape, and sometimes being eaten by tumors and cysts. I just don’t understand what seeing it is supposed to accomplish.

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Gastrointestinal Pathologies

April 15, 2010

Review of Mosby’s Pathology for Massage Therapists, by Salvo and Anderson. Within the course of Dr. Johnson.

While reading Chapter 9 I learned about Gastrointestinal Pathologies. The Gastrointestinal system is responsible for the digestion and processing of the food necessary to live. Some signs and symptoms of common pathologies are blood in stool, nausea or vomiting, abdominal pain and a few more. Anorexia Nervosa is a known gastrointestinal pathology, this is an eating disorder when the client avoids food for a very long time, massage can be performed with clearance from their health care provider, the massage should be soft and nurturing. A Hernia is also common, it is a protrusion of an organ that has moved through a cavity wall or connective tissue, it can happen soon after birth due to walls not fully closing, massage can be preformed if the hernia does not cause pain.

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Gastrointestinal Pathology

April 15, 2010

Review of Mosby’s Pathology for Massage Therapists, by Salvo and Anderson. Within the course of Dr. Johnson.

Chapter 9 might be the most painful section for me to review. For two straight years, I had untreated GIRD. The pain still haunts me to remind me to take my acid management medicine. However, the experience has allowed for some intimate knowledge on contraindications and comfortable positions for people with gastrointestinal ailments. Once again, unless I plan on biopsying my clients, why do I need to see appendicitis, or liver damage, or colonectomy surgery? I do not understand why this book insists on showing me things I cannot legally evaluate from the outside of a person’s body. Beyond that, though, it includes useful information on how to handle some liver and kidney diseases and shows us what to expect if someone’s colon has been replaced.

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Respiratory Pathologies

April 15, 2010

Review of Mosby’s Pathology for Massage Therapists, by Salvo and Anderson. Within the course of Dr. Johnson.

While reading Chapter 8 in my text book I learned about Respiratory pathologies. The respiratory system is how our bodies take in and exchange oxygen. A common pathology is Asthma, a chronic inflammation if the airways cause by sensitivity to different stimuli, massage can be preformed, but the therapist should make sure nothing in the room can stimulate an episode, and if they use an inhaler make sure it is in close reach. Tuberculosis is a chronic lung infection, it can cause a decrease of gas exchange in the lungs, massage in contraindicated until client is no longer infected.

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Sleep Apnea and Massage, comment

April 15, 2010

This is actually one I must have missed. Very good disorder to point out, as a therapist must watch out for apnea on the table. Once again, however, I must submit my assignment here, failing yet again to find the button to submit an article of my own. Chapter 8 has a short and sweet introduction. It still gets the job done pretty well, and the images are decent (although the one on asthma seems a bit lacking, without a side-by-side comparison). I really had to appreciate the irony of this section, as I have been nursing cold-like symptoms for over two weeks now. Once again, I have to criticize my "need to know" on several very graphic pictures of lung and upper respiratory tissue, considering that I am neither trained nor qualified in biopsies to see this in the real world (especially without a side-by-side comparison to healthy tissue, to those of us who are visual learners). As critical as I may be at the necessity of seeing internal organs, this chapter did give some good examples of the external signs of certain respiratory diseases, especially when a significant amount of the ailments can be filtered down to fit between the archetypes of COPD.

Original Post
March 9, 2010
Title: Sleep Apnea and Massage
Sleep apnea is one of the common sleep disorders. It occurs when you stop breathing during the night. This is characterized by shallow breathes and loud snoring with pauses between breathes that last 10 seconds or more. People who have this condition, wake up frequently during the night to breathe. Some symptoms of sleep apnea are long gaps in breathing, very loud snoring, gasping or choking and not feeling rested in the morning. This condition usually occurs because of some sort of obstruction in the air passage. Massage cannot be used to treat sleep apnea, but can be performed for a client to rejuvenate and perhaps alleviate some symptoms of depression, if he has any.

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Chapter 7

April 15, 2010

Review of Mosby’s Pathology for Massage Therapists, by Salvo and Anderson. Within the course of Dr. Johnson.

While reading Chapter 7, I learned about Cardiovascular and Lymphatic/Immune pathologies. Both systems are very closely linked, and both play a major role in maintaining homeostasis. Some signs and symptoms that come with the pathologies are difficulty breathing, skin discoloration, swollen lymph nodes, failure to gain or maintain weight, and a few more. Anemia is a common cardiovascular pathology, it is when oxygen-carrying blood is reduced and the client has fatigue, and paleness in skin, and dizziness, a massage can be preformed if the client is feeling well enough, if the client is to tired the massage can make them feel worse. AIDS is a Lymphatic/Immune pathology, it is and autoimmune disease and massage can be preformed, but the therapist need to check on the clients vitality before each massage.

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Cardiovascular and Lymphatic/Immune Pathologies

April 15, 2010

Review of Mosby’s Pathology for Massage Therapists, by Salvo and Anderson. Within the course of Dr. Johnson.

Chapter 7 has quite a long introduction. That is justifiable, though. After all, there are many different subsystems and tissues, even a whole second system, the lymphatic/endocrine system, all related or incorporated into the circulatory system. More than justifiable, it’s full of useful and clear diagrams that effectively clarify parts and pieces of both the circulatory system and lymphatic system. I have to admit, though, that I was surprised at just how far beyond varicose and spider veins this chapter would go, including special massage instructions for edema, Sickle Cell Disease, and Raynaud’s Syndrome. I have a feeling this chapter will stay permanently bookmarked, as some of these ailments are relevant to the focus of my future business.

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