Archive for the ‘Gastrointestinal Pathology’ Category

Gastrointestinal Pathologies

November 29, 2010

Review of Mosby’s Pathology for Massage Therapists, 2nd edition, by Salvo and Anderson. Within the course of Dr. Johnson.

Classes of nutrients for the body are carbohydrates, proteins, lipids, vitamins, minerals, and water. Carbohydrates, proteins, and lipids break down into smaller molecules. Carbohydrates break down into simple sugars called monosaccharides. Proteins break down into amino acids. Lipids break down into glycerol and fatty acids. The digestive system consists of the gastrointestinal tract and it’s accessory digestive organs. The digestive process begins in the mouth, then the food moves down into the stomach where it is mixed with gastric juices. The food becomes chyme and moves into the small intestines. Next the chyme moves through the colon for absorption and lastly, defecation. General dysfunctions of the GI tract include nausea, vomiting, constipation and diarrhea. Mumps, thrush, tonsillitis, gastroesophageal reflux disease, peptic ulcer disease, gastritis, and gastroenteritis are diseases of the upper GI tract. Diseases of the lower GI tract include polyps, diverticulitis, diverticulosis, irritable bowel syndrome, ulcerative colitis, Crohn disease, intestinal obstruction, appendicitis, and hemorrhoids. The chapter also gives an overview of jaundice, viral hepatitis, cirrhosis, cholelithiasis, cholecystitis, and pancreatitis. The chapter concludes with a discussion of the different types of hernias.

Types and Massage Considerations for Viral Hepatitis

August 19, 2010

There are five different types of viral hepatitis. All types of viral hepatitis damage liver cells. Hepatitis A, also known as infectious hepatitis, is transmitted via the oral-fecal route. Hepatitis B, also known as serum hepatitis, is contracted through sexual contact or through blood contact like sharing needles or contaminated instruments used in tattooing. Hepatitis C is also transmitted through blood contact. Hepatitis D, also known as delta hepatitis, is contracted through sexual contact or through contaminated instruments like needles or passed from mother to child during birth. The last type of hepatitis is Hepatitis D which is passed along through the oral/fecal route, typically from contaminated waters from natural disasters. Viruses that cause hepatitis cannot be eliminated; however, there are medicines that can slow viral replications and medications that can help to manage the symptoms. Massage considerations depend on the patients symptoms. If the patient has a fever or jaundice, massage is contraindicated. If the patient has clearance to receive a massage, avoid the abdomen, do not use deep pressure, and reduce treatment time to 30 minutes to avoid the client from becoming fatigued.

Gastrointestinal Side Effects

July 30, 2010

Review of Mosby’s Pathology for Massage Therapists, 2nd edition, by Salvo and Anderson. Within the course of Dr. Johnson.

The gastro intestinal disorders described in the book and power point have side effects that could affect the way therapy is conducted and that I should be aware of. For example, people who are obese may tend to get tired more easily, and tend to have tense back, neck, shoulder and leg muscles from carrying all the extra weight. Areas with excess fat are also more susceptible to bruising. These are all factors I would take into account when planning a patients’ therapy. Celiac Disease also has some gastrointestinal side effects that could affect how the therapy session was planned out. This disease causes frequent diarrhea, so the patient may have to stop for bathroom breaks.

Celiac Disease

July 21, 2010

I spent a majority of my life suffering from many of the symptoms of celiac disease. I would tell my doctors and other health care professionals about how I was always tired and just never felt good in general. I would be tested for anemia, the test would come back negative, and I would be told to sleep more and take vitamins. Finally, last August, a new doctor tested me for celiac disease and the test came back as positive. If it was not for this doctor being aware of the symptoms and the disease, I would still be eating large amounts of bread and wondering why I always felt so sick. It is very important for those working in massage therapy to be aware of the symptoms of various diseases. Massage therapists are in a position where they usually see patients on a regular basis. They get to know their patients well. The patients will probably share various health concerns with the therapist, through evaluation or just casual talk. What may seem like a common, unimportant complaint to the patient may be a sign of a more serious problem. If the massage therapist can pick up on this, it may save a patient’s life.

Gastrointestinal System Pathology

July 19, 2010

Review of Mosby’s Pathology for Massage Therapists, 2nd edition, by Salvo and Anderson. Within the course of Dr. Johnson.

As I read gastrointestinal pathologies I was brought back to a memory when I went to mexico and got very ill from the food and water not knowing about the different things going on with your gastrointestinal tract could lead to worse things. Nausea and actual vomiting can mean many things and learning about the diseases of the upper gastrointestinal tract were interesting I had only heard about tonsillitis. I had no clue all the other things were connected to the tract and it shows how everything in the body are connecting and how we should try and balance as much as we can and massage can help with many of these ailments.

Gastrointestinal Disorders, comment

July 16, 2010

While I do not include abdominal massage during my routine, I do recall from our classroom time that abdominal massage is good for gastrointestinal issues.  I have not had any clients who have had gastrointestinal issues, but if I did have such a client I would inquire if they need something special from the session and I would inquire if my client would like some abdominal massage.

Original Post

June 2, 2010

Title: Maya Abdominal massage

According to the Arvigo Massage Center: Maya Abdominal Massage is a non-invasive external massage technique to the abdomen and pelvis that helps to guide to the internal reproductive organs into their proper position, and relieve tension in the diaphragm. The massage improves organ function by releasing physical and emotional congestion, thereby helping to re-establish health in the pelvic region. Maya abdominal massage for the reproductive and digestive systems has been known and practiced for thousands of years, the technique having been passed down through an unbroken chain of midwives, healers and shaman, generation after generation, all over the world from Central America to Africa, Egypt and China. This knowledge has largely been forgotten or suppressed in this century. The technique, as practiced today, was developed by Dr Rosita Arvigo. Rosita moved to Belize from America in 1981 and set up a naprapathic (a branch of chiropractic) clinic with her husband. Two years later, she met and befriended one of the last of the traditional Maya shaman, Don Elijio Panti. After some persuasion, he agreed to take her on as his apprentice and over the next 10 years, imparted to her his wisdom of the healing plants of the rainforest, traditional massage, including the abdominal techniques and spiritual healing. Don Elijio passed away in 1996, aged 103. Since this time Rosita has taken the knowledge she learned from him, and combined it with her Western naprapathic and herbal training to form the Arvigo Techniques of Maya Abdominal Massage. Some of the common symptoms, which can be helped by Maya Abdominal Massage and may indicate a displaced uterus, tight diaphragm or twisted pelvis include the following: Painful or irregular periods and ovulation – Dark, thick fluids at the beginning & end of menses – Amenorrhoea/Dismenorrhoea – Headaches/ Dizziness with menses – PMS – Endometriosis/Endometritis – Uterine polyps – Ovarian cysts/Fibroids – Vaginitis – Uterine infections – Hormonal imbalances – Difficult menopause – Painful intercourse – Infertility – Difficult pregnancy & delivery – Premature deliveries – Weak newborn infants – Lower back ache – Tired legs, numb feet/ Sore heals – Varicose veins – Chronic indigestion/Heartburn – Chronic constipation – Gastritis – Frequent or painful urination – Bladder infections

Colon polyps and stomach massage

July 14, 2010

Colon polyps seem to be on the rise. A family that I know has had two of their three children in their mid-thirties diagnosed with colon polyps. Both of the parents which are in their 50’s had the polyps also. Noone in this family that was diagnosed, exercises or eats right and two of them are heavy smokers. They are all over weight and all but one of them are sick regularly with anything that comes along. The only child that has not had polyps, is in his early thirties, he exercises regularly, is a healthy weight, and does not smoke. His diet is better than the other family members but not as good as it should be. After receiving clearance from their physcian, if they were to incorperate a high fiber diet and fresh fruit in addition to regular stomach massage this would increase the circulation to the colon and promote healthy bowel movements possibly lowering the risk of new polyps developing. Deep lymphatic stomach massage is great for getting build up loosened up in the corners of the intestines and getting fresh blood and oxygen into the abdomen to assist it in doing the job it was designed for.

Gastrointestinal Problems Diseases

July 6, 2010

Personally interesting to me to read about colon problems since having had surgery for diverticulitis. I must get more fiber in my diet! Abdominal massage should be considered and performed with light/medium pressure if comfortable to client or not at all if client is experiencing pain.

Maya Abdominal massage

June 2, 2010

According to the Arvigo Massage Center: Maya Abdominal Massage is a non-invasive external massage technique to the abdomen and pelvis that helps to guide to the internal reproductive organs into their proper position, and relieve tension in the diaphragm. The massage improves organ function by releasing physical and emotional congestion, thereby helping to re-establish health in the pelvic region. Maya abdominal massage for the reproductive and digestive systems has been known and practiced for thousands of years, the technique having been passed down through an unbroken chain of midwives, healers and shaman, generation after generation, all over the world from Central America to Africa, Egypt and China. This knowledge has largely been forgotten or suppressed in this century. The technique, as practiced today, was developed by Dr Rosita Arvigo. Rosita moved to Belize from America in 1981 and set up a naprapathic (a branch of chiropractic) clinic with her husband. Two years later, she met and befriended one of the last of the traditional Maya shaman, Don Elijio Panti. After some persuasion, he agreed to take her on as his apprentice and over the next 10 years, imparted to her his wisdom of the healing plants of the rainforest, traditional massage, including the abdominal techniques and spiritual healing. Don Elijio passed away in 1996, aged 103. Since this time Rosita has taken the knowledge she learned from him, and combined it with her Western naprapathic and herbal training to form the Arvigo Techniques of Maya Abdominal Massage. Some of the common symptoms, which can be helped by Maya Abdominal Massage and may indicate a displaced uterus, tight diaphragm or twisted pelvis include the following: Painful or irregular periods and ovulation – Dark, thick fluids at the beginning & end of menses – Amenorrhoea/Dismenorrhoea – Headaches/ Dizziness with menses – PMS – Endometriosis/Endometritis – Uterine polyps – Ovarian cysts/Fibroids – Vaginitis – Uterine infections – Hormonal imbalances – Difficult menopause – Painful intercourse – Infertility – Difficult pregnancy & delivery – Premature deliveries – Weak newborn infants – Lower back ache – Tired legs, numb feet/ Sore heals – Varicose veins – Chronic indigestion/Heartburn – Chronic constipation – Gastritis – Frequent or painful urination – Bladder infections

Infant Massage for constipation

June 2, 2010

Review of Mosby’s Pathology for Massage Therapists 2nd edition, by Salvo and Anderson.

Chapter 11 has a subsection that discusses constipation. I know that constipation is quite common in infants and have used massage techniques to help the problem. The method used for an adult involves some type of abdominal massage by stimulating forward movement of intestinal contents. The client is recommended to be in the supine position with flexed knees. Circular gliding strokes, kneading and vibration in a clockwise direction on the abdominal area are to be used. A similar method is used for infants as well. If the infant is constipated, you can perform a tummy massage by gently massaging and rubbing the baby’s tummy in a clockwise direction. Place your hands at baby’s navel and massage in a circular motion, moving your hand(s) out and away from the center of baby’s belly. You can also bicycle the infant’s legs by placing the baby on the back and lightly holding the legs in a half-bent position. Gently begin to move the baby’s legs as if he/she is riding a bicycle. It is recommended that the massage therapist alternate “Bicycle Legs” with Tummy Massage. “Bicycle Legs” also may help to relieve a baby who is gassy.

Gastrointestinal System Pathologies Chapter 11

May 3, 2010

The chapter on gastrointestinal system pathologies was a great chapter I liked the information it had on the General Dysfunction of the Gastrointestinal Tract ex: Nausea, Vomiting etc. I also liked the information on the upper gastrointestinal Tract, Mumps, tonsillitis Reflux Disease, to name a few. The lower gastrointestinal tract, diseases of the liver, gallbladder, and Pancreas have been very interesting. The disorders of nutrient intake and absorption, the other gastrointestinal disorders and the hernias section were all very interesting. I have been learning a lot during this pathology course and think it has been very helpful and all massage therapist defiantly need to know there pathology or at the very least have the book handy for reference. Every Pathology in the book has been helpful and I am so much more knowledgeable then I was before I started this book.

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gastrointestinal system pathologies

April 23, 2010

The body needs energy for survival, with energy the body can create new tissues, and repair damaged or worn out organs. There are six classes of nutrients: carbohydrates, proteins, lipids, vitamins, minerals and water, the last three can be absorbed as they, do not need any further breaking down. During digestion, the chemicals released by the digestive system, break down complex structures like carbohydrates, proteins and lipids. This is broken down into molecules like monosaccharides, amino acids, and triglycerides that are easily absorbed by the body. All this takes place in a synchronized manner from mouth to anus, the food is chewed by the mouth into small pieces and mixed with the saliva forming a bolus that will go down the esophagus and into the stomach for mixing with digestive juices and enzymes, and after some time depending on how heavy was the meal. The bolus becomes a watery substance called chime, the pyloric sphincter opens and the chime goes down the duodenum, there, sensors will tell how much of bile is needed to break down the fat, next pancreas will do its job. This could take from three to ten hours; most of the nutrients will be absorbed. Once in the colon most of the water will be absorbed and will become the feces, with the help of peristaltic movements they will be transported to the anus to be expelled. There are many pathologies that can affect the gastrointestinal tract the massage therapist should be very careful wile assessing clients with different gastrointestinal pathologies and if any abnormality is found during abdominal massage, the client should be advice to look for medical diagnosis.

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