Posts Tagged ‘Massage Pathology Chronicles’

Detoxification, comment

April 6, 2011

I use massage therapy to assist with a detoxification process. This combination is enjoyed and useful by many of my clients. What type of water flush is to be used in the article Detoxification, comment is my question. I use water in multiple sessions for the colon flush, oral/gastrointestinal flush, and/or external skin flush in a shower.

Original Post
April 5, 2011
Title: Detoxification, comment
I agree that we need to focus on lymph and blood also, not just the liver and colon. There are several ways to accomplish this such as massage therapy with large water flush afterwards to help with the toxins that are mobilized during the massage. There are also many botanicals that work on restoring/cleaning the blood. Even yet another way that is commonly forgotten is through the skin. I always become alarmed when someone tells me they don’t sweat much anymore. I get this mental image that everything is blocked up inside not just pores. I always tell them they need to promote sweating to help rid themselves of toxins, especially plastic and dioxins that build up so much from our environment. I further recommend that they first off stop using anti-perspirants that stop this process. I also recommend they try botanicals and hydrotherapy that promote diuresis and diaphoresis like dandelion and nettles and increase their water intake tremendously. If that does do enough there is the far infrared sauna with high temperatures that can be tolerated by even clients with lung and heart disease and promote the removal of many toxins. Of course we are not to forget ways to rid our bodies of heavy metals that can build up and cause illness like the use of increased fiber to decrease transit time in the gut and chelating agents both orally (if not severe or IV EDTA for those with severe heavy metal poisoning. All in all, detoxification warrants our attention to assure our bodies are functioning at optimal levels and to prevent future illness with the ever increasing toxic load from our environment.

Original Post
October 4, 2010
Title: Detoxification
Detoxification refers to the elimination of poisons or toxins. Detoxification programs include a vast variety of treatments aimed at getting rid of body toxins and improving health. Many organs in the body such as liver, lungs, kidneys, gastrointestinal tract, and skin all work to eliminate toxins that we take in. These organs detoxify toxins in a perfect manner. However, the huge amounts of today’s environmental contaminants attacking the immune system and it would be too tough to challenge for these detoxifying organs to eliminate the toxins and do their jobs. The toxins remain in our bodies and accumulating each day.

When the food we eat and the water we drink leave the stomach, they enter the small intestine where they mix with digestive enzymes. These enzymes break down the food’s fats, proteins, and carbohydrates into simple compounds. Some of these simple compounds go to the liver to be metabolized. Others are carried away by the lymph, an important part of the immune system. What’s left travels on through the large intestine, or colon, where water is removed and bowel movements are formed.

But if toxins in the food we eat and the water we drink cannot be destroyed by the digestive enzymes, or detoxified by the liver, or eliminated by the immune system, they begin to build up. As these toxins accumulate, they will affect every part of our body: slow our metabolism, rob us of energy, reduce our immunity, and can even lead to serious chronic illness. Therefore, the body needs a serious method of cleansing system.

Most detoxification supplements focus only on the liver and colon. That’s because significant amounts of our body’s own detoxification method happens in these important digestive organs. However, the only way to make sure that detoxification is truly successful, is to cleanse the whole body. Therefore, the detoxification of the blood and lymph considered very important. These two organs considered very important in nourish and protect the liver, colon, and every other organ, tissue, and cell. If toxins are present in blood or lymph, every organ, tissue, and cell will be exposed to these toxins and contaminants, too.

Detoxifying the colon and liver without cleansing the blood and lymph is considered nearly nothing. Therefore, in order to have the best result for detoxification program both organs and the blood and the lymph system must be in attention for detoxification plan. In this way we expect that the body working in its best performance.

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The Fate of Naturopathic Medicine, comment

April 6, 2011

I think people should also be free to choose massage therapist as one of the available healthcare providers. It is important for us to work with medical doctors, chiropractors and others. I work with medical doctors and chiropractors. My services are then covered by insurance, the client’s deductible, and the client’s copay. Some insurance companies to do cover massage therapy, but their client want it. The massage therapy coverage should be an option in all medical and health insurance. As long as the massage therapist is certified, the insurance companies do not need to worry about quality. There are some of us who are not certified, but working on certification. These therapists still provide quality massages.

Original Post
April 4, 2011
Title: The Fate of Naturopathic Medicine, comment

Well, I guess it has begun or for some it continues to worsen. The Constitution was signed to provide us with many freedoms. One of those was supposed to be the freedom to make our own medical choices. We don’t have that in this country anymore. If we don’t go along with the “medical mafia” (as my father fondly refers to them) and pharmaceutical companies and their plan for our health care, we have to pay for everything out-of-pocket.
The health savings account (HSA), flexible spending accounts (FSA) were originally a way that many alternative medicines and practices could be covered under our health insurance via our employer. Now, as of January 1, 2011, you must go to your “approved health care provider” (HCP) and get prescriptions for any herbals or supplements you may be using to treat illness and medical problems. You must also pay for these items in advance and go through the time and paperwork and expense of seeing your approved HCP to get such items. Then, after all of that, some bureaucrat with the government and/or your insurance company decides whether or not this expense will be approved. I currently have botanical meds, supplements, dental work, and other medical bills (preventative medicine) pending approval before my employer health benefit bank (HSA, FSA) (excess of $2,300.00) will release the funds to pay for these.

I do understand the need to protect the public from unsafe practices and practitioners out there, but there has to be a better way to allow people to choose their own health care whether it be traditional medicine, acupuncture and TCM, naturopathic medicine, homeopathic medicine or even a shaman or folk healer. Why can there not be designated experts in these areas to help keep the public safe while still allowing them to make their own decisions about how to care for their own bodies. We have rights to our bodies when we want to choose to terminate a life inside of us, but are losing our rights at an alarming rate to prevent illness and restore health in our bodies. (p.s. my father is now 80 years old, in excellent health and on no synthetic meds, he eats natural whole foods, does not smoke, likes an occasion beer or glass of wine and still enjoys operating his farm and carpentry.)

Original Post
May 17, 2010
Title: The Fate of Naturopathic Medicine
With all the buzz around about President Obama’s healthcare plan, how will this impact Naturopathic medicine and better yet, will there still be such a thin as a health savings account?

Currently, in regards to healthcare in this country, the only way I could benefit from by employers healthcare benefit for me was to have a high deductible insurance plan that would cover me in the event of a catastrophic illness or accident and adding a health savings account. Since I do not use traditional medicine very often, the high deductible insurance with it’s low monthly cost can provide some coverage for me if needed. I added a health savings account which I contribute fifty dollar to each month that is matched by my employer. They also started me off with one thousand dollars to be used over the first year until I could accrue more money on my own to offset the cost of doctor visits, hospital costs, vision and dental exams and prescription drugs, etc. I was able to use this money to cover the cost of thing that I use for medical treatment such as chiropractic adjustments, medical massage, nutritional supplements and even most of the bulk herbs I use.

This has worked out very well me myself and my family over the past few years. What will happen when Obama’s healthcare plan goes into effect. I fear that not only will I being paying for healthcare I might rarely be able to use, but also paying more as a nurse who currently is being considered high risk on the plan and more money will be taken from my paycheck. Also as a hospice nurse, currently, Obama’s plan is to either drastically cut the hospice benefit or possibly eliminate it all together. My field of nursing may also be eliminated.

The US Constitution promised us many freedoms. Many of these freedoms have been amended to suit the government and not the people. Certainly, the freedom to chose our own form of healthcare has not been provided for fairly in the past and it seems now will be restricted even more. Are there any thoughts on a course of action to help people who choose a more natural approach to medical care?

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Dermatologic Pathologies, comment

March 7, 2011

I come across eczema, bruises, and scrapes quite often as an occupational therapist. The textbook is quite helpful for me. While at work, I find myself referring to the book sometimes (now that it is on my bookshelf).

Original Post
November 26, 2010
Title: Dermatologic Pathologies
Review of Mosby’s Pathology for Massage Therapists, 2nd edition, by Salvo and Anderson. Within the course of Dr. Johnson.

I found this chapter to be nice review for skin pathologies. While chiropractic care does not involve as global skin contact as massage therapy, it is still important to recognize these pathologies. Visual inspection is a major component of chiropractic physical examination. Therefore, it was not a lost for me to have this review of common dermatologic pathologies. Some of these pathologies being: impetigo, folliculitis, tinea pedis, HSV, eczema, rosacea and contact dermatitis. The pictures are helpful, even though not very delightful.

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Medications, comment

March 3, 2011

I am like you in that I did not realize the facts about acetaminophen and antidepressants. Another fact I came across is that antidepressants are used for chronic pain. Wow, there is a lot to learn.

Original Post
November 26, 2010
Title: Medications

Review of Mosby’s Pathology for Massage Therapists, 2nd edition, by Salvo and Anderson. Within the course of Dr. Johnson.

I found this chapter to be quite vital for client care. A huge percentage of clients will be on some form of medication. Therefore, it is vital to understand how these medications may interact with the body. It becomes critical to understand medical contraindications to avoid causing more harm to the client. I did not realize that while acetaminophen is classified as a NSAID but does not have antiinflammatory properties. I also was unaware that antidepressants were prescribed for eating disorders and migraine headaches. I plan to also maintain a list of medication recalls to share with clients that may be unaware.

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Cancer

December 1, 2010

Review of Mosby’s Pathology for Massage Therapists, 2nd edition, by Salvo and Anderson. Within the course of Dr. Johnson.

Cancer is a leading cause of death in the US. The American Cancer Society advocates for massage therapy for cancer patients to assist in comfort and improving quality of life. The leading site for cancer in women are the breast, while the prostate is the leading site for men. Another name for a tumor is neoplasm. The study of malignant tumors is called oncology. Angiogenesis is the ability of cancer cells to develop a vascular network which allows for tumor growth and access to the bloodstream. The key component for cancer cell invasion is the ability for the cancer cells to migrate. The lymphatic system and bloodstream are the most common routes used for metasis. Benefits of massage for cancer patients include boosting of the immune system, reduction or prevention of edema, decrease nausea, reduction of fatigue, assistance with quality of life and survival of skin during radiation therapy. When servicing cancer patients, it is advisable to also address any other medical conditions. Massages should be scheduled during high energy times and deep, vigorous massage should be avoided. It is vital to note for fatigue and discomfort during massage. Current methods of treatment for cancer patients include surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy. The chapter concludes with an overview of types of cancer in various regions of the body.

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Mental Health Disorders

November 29, 2010

Review of Mosby’s Pathology for Massage Therapists, 2nd edition, by Salvo and Anderson. Within the course of Dr. Johnson.

Mental health is defined as the capacity to cope and adjust to the ongoing stresses of everyday life. Significant impairment of mental health to the point of inability to function is characterized as mental disorder. Neurotransmitters in the brain that are associated with mental and emotional disorders are gamma-aminobutyric acid, acetylcholine, serotonin, dopamine, and norepinephrine. The following anxiety disorders are reviewed in this chapter: generalized anxiety disorder, panic disorder, phobia disorder, obsessive-compulsive disorder, and posttraumatic stress disorder. This chapter also discussed depression. Depression is classified as a mood disorder and as an affective disoder. The two hallmark signs of depression are prolonged period of profound sadness with marked hopelessness and a loss of self-esteem with a lack of interest in any activity. The chapter concludes with a discussion on emotional release during massage.

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Urinary Pathologies

November 29, 2010

Review of Mosby’s Pathology for Massage Therapists, 2nd edition, by Salvo and Anderson. Within the course of Dr. Johnson.

The kidneys are the primary organs of the urinary system. Other organs of the urinary system are ureters, urinary bladder, and urethra. The functions of the kidneys are regulation of blood levels of ions, regulation of blood pH, adjusting blood volume, regulation of blood pressure, production of hormones, and the production and excretion of waste. The kidney produces two hormones: calcitrol and erythropoietin. The kidney contain a million of nephrons. Nephrons are the functional units of the kidneys. Blood cells and proteins are too large to fit through the filtration of membrane. Therefore, the presence of either molecules in urine indicate kidney dysfunction. The juxtaglomerular apparatus in the nephron measures the body’s blood pressure. An overview of glomerunephritis, nephrotic syndrome, kidney stones, pyelnephritis, polycystic kidney disease, and renal failure follow in the chapter. The chapter concludes with a discussion of disorders of the bladder and urinary tract.

Gastrointestinal Pathologies

November 29, 2010

Review of Mosby’s Pathology for Massage Therapists, 2nd edition, by Salvo and Anderson. Within the course of Dr. Johnson.

Classes of nutrients for the body are carbohydrates, proteins, lipids, vitamins, minerals, and water. Carbohydrates, proteins, and lipids break down into smaller molecules. Carbohydrates break down into simple sugars called monosaccharides. Proteins break down into amino acids. Lipids break down into glycerol and fatty acids. The digestive system consists of the gastrointestinal tract and it’s accessory digestive organs. The digestive process begins in the mouth, then the food moves down into the stomach where it is mixed with gastric juices. The food becomes chyme and moves into the small intestines. Next the chyme moves through the colon for absorption and lastly, defecation. General dysfunctions of the GI tract include nausea, vomiting, constipation and diarrhea. Mumps, thrush, tonsillitis, gastroesophageal reflux disease, peptic ulcer disease, gastritis, and gastroenteritis are diseases of the upper GI tract. Diseases of the lower GI tract include polyps, diverticulitis, diverticulosis, irritable bowel syndrome, ulcerative colitis, Crohn disease, intestinal obstruction, appendicitis, and hemorrhoids. The chapter also gives an overview of jaundice, viral hepatitis, cirrhosis, cholelithiasis, cholecystitis, and pancreatitis. The chapter concludes with a discussion of the different types of hernias.

Respiratory Pathologies

November 29, 2010

Review of Mosby’s Pathology for Massage Therapists, 2nd edition, by Salvo and Anderson. Within the course of Dr. Johnson.

The respiratory system functions are exchange of gases, regulation of blood pH, providing sense of smell, filtration of incoming air, production of sounds, and elimination of water and heat. Pulmonary ventilation is the movement of air into and out of the lungs by way of muscle contraction and relaxation, and the elastic recoil of the alveoli. The diaphragm is the primary muscle involved with inspiration. Common cold, sinusitis, pharyngitis, larnygitis, influenza, and infectious mononucleosis are the upper respiratory tract infections discussed in this chapter. Massage is contraindicated during acute and active stages of these infections. Overviews of low respiratory tract infections of pleurisy, pneumonia, and tuberculosis are discussed. There are two types of pleurisy: wet and dry. Wet pleurisy refers to an increase in intrapleural fluids, while dry pleurisy refers to decrese in intrapleural fluids. The most common infectious disease causing death in the US in pnenumonia. Tuberculosis is a bacterial lung infection transmitted by inhalation of infected droplets. Massage should be postponed until 4 weeks after the start of treatment. The two main stages of disease are primary and secondary. Most people with primary TB are asymptomatic or the patient may experience generalized symptoms. Secondary TB can present with cough with blood sputum, high fever, night sweats, general anxiety, and shortness of breath. Chronic obstructive pulmonary diseases are characterized by obstructed airflow that worsens with exertion. The chapter overviews asthma, bronchitis, emphysema, pneumonconiosis, bronchiectasis, cystic fibrosis, and obstructive sleep apnea. Pulmonary edema and embolism are the vascular disorders discussed. Acute respiratory distress syndrome can result in multiple organ failure and death making it a medical emergency. The chapter concludes with a brief overview of hay fever.

Lymphatic and Immune System Pathologies

November 29, 2010

Review of Mosby’s Pathology for Massage Therapists, 2nd edition, by Salvo and Anderson. Within the course of Dr. Johnson.

The lymphatic system is composed of lymph, lymphocytes, lymphatic vessels, lymph nodes, and lymphoid tissue of organs and glands. The function of the lymphatic system is to drain excess interstitial fluid, transport dietary lipids and vitamins, and to carry out immune functions. The chapter goes into more detailed overview of these functions. The body has two types of immunity: natural and acquired. The two types of lymphocytes are B and T. Both are formed in red bone marrow. B lymphocytes mature in the red bone marrow while T lymphocytes mature in the thymus. The chapter concludes with discussion of conditions of the lymphatic and immune systems.

Cardiovascular Pathologies

November 29, 2010

Review of Mosby’s Pathology for Massage Therapists, 2nd edition, by Salvo and Anderson. Within the course of Dr. Johnson.

This chapter begins with descriptions of the three types of fluids: blood, interstitial fluid, and lymph, that assistance in the maintenance of homeostasis. The main components of the cardiovascular system are blood, heart and blood vessels. The function of blood being to transport glucose, amino acids, lipids and hormones, transporting oxygen to lungs and nutrients to digestive tract, removing wastes, regulation of pH and body temperature, protection of the body from disease, and blood clotting. Erythrocytes, leukocytes, and thrombocytes are the types of blood cells. Pericardium, myocardium, endocardium, and epicardium are the four layers of the heart. The type of blood vessels are arteries, capillaries, and veins. Arteries take blood away from the heart, while veins take blood to the heart. Capillaries are the smallest of the blood vessels and functions to distribute nutrients and remove waste through interstitial fluid. Disorders of blood and circulation are discussed. Followed by an overview of disorders of the heart. The chapter concludes with a discussion on the diseases of arteries and veins.

Endocrine Pathologies

November 26, 2010

Review of Mosby’s Pathology for Massage Therapists, 2nd edition, by Salvo and Anderson. Within the course of Dr. Johnson.

The endocrine system uses hormones to communicate and works in conjuction with the nervous system. Massage can be beneficial to the endocrine system by reducing stress that indirectly lowers stress hormone levels in the endocrine glands. The role of the endocrine system is to regulate activities of smooth and cardiac muscle along with some glands, regulation of chemical composition and volume of fluids, regulation of growth and development, alteration of metabolism, regulation of reproductive processes and participation in circadian rhythms. The endocrine has two categories of glands: exocrine, that secrete into empty body cavities, hollow centers of organs, and surface of the body; and endocrine, that secrete hormones into the bloodstream and nearby cells. Diseases of the pituitary are discussed. Diseases of the thyroid and parathyroid follow next in the chapter. The chapter has an overview of diabetes mellitus. The chapter concludes with an overview of diseases of the adrenal cortex.


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