Archive for May, 2009

Client Intake and Health Assessment

May 29, 2009

RE: Mosby’s Pathology for Massage Therapists by Susan G. Salvo & Sandra Kauffman Anderson, Chapter 2 within Dr. Johnson’s class.

I learned a lot about the detail you can get into when doing assessments on people. I think this is very valuable with people that have more issues especially chronic cases or cases involving a multitude of issues. I plan on incorporating much of the information in this chapter to the design of my intake forms.

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Disease awareness and infection control

May 28, 2009

RE: Mosby’s Pathology for Massage Therapists by Susan G. Salvo & Sandra Kauffman Anderson.
Chapter 1, Disease awareness and infection control: This chapter was detailed about what disease is and how to keep it under control. I think this should be taught in main stream schools starting at a young age. I particularly like their use of pictures to show how to glove/unglove as well as scrub and rinse correctly when washing hands.

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Bell’s Palsy

May 27, 2009

When I began training at my massage school, I worked on a client with Bell’s Palsy. A week ago, I met the same client and was pleased to discover the symptoms of Bell’s Palsy were absent. I also knew a former co-worker at another job who had contracted Bell’s Palsy. The entire right side of his face was slack. Although we were shocked to begin with, the effects soon subsided after about two months. His case of Bell’s Palsy was preceded by an upper respiratory tract infection.

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Headaches

May 25, 2009

I often receive clients who experience frequent headaches due to minor muscle soreness and stress. Tonight, however, I received a client who was in the middle of a very painful headache. Instead of taking any type of medication, she made an emergency massage appointment. In the intake and assessment period, I noticed her eyes appeared ‘sleepy’. Her responses to questioning were slow and labored. It was obvious she was in pain and upon discovering her headache, I proceeded to address where it was located and what type of pain it was. As it was in her eye and temples and only a dull throbbing, we proceeded with the massage. I focused primarily on the Traps, Levator Scapulae and Splenius muscles. Finished the session with facial acupressure, focusing on the sinuses. Her headache was completely alleviated, thanks to my new assessment tools!

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Identifying Pigmentations

May 21, 2009

I was recently working on a client and using my new found powers of observation found in Chapter 3 of Mosby’s Pathology. While working on my client, I found many skin anomalies that I would have normally considered locally contraindicated, as I was not sure what the anomaly actually is. I discovered many age spots on my client, as he spends a large majority of his time outdoors in direct sunlight. I initially thought they might be cancerous, but upon further investigation and questioning, found them merely to be pigmented lesions due to chronic sun exposure. Knowledge is power!

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Client Intake

May 21, 2009

In my intern work at my massage school, we use a very limited intake form for our new clients. I have created my own intake forms with additional notes for returning clients therapy. I have found that clients are impressed with the care I take in making sure I document not only their concerns, but their progress as well. I have more returning clients in my internship, as they prefer a therapist who takes the time to notate ongoing progress.

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Illness as a contraindication to massage

May 20, 2009

As a massage student, I was recently faced with a dilemma concerning illness…my own. When I awoke one morning before class, I felt the symptoms of a common cold. Facing a major palpation test that evening in massage school, I decided to proceed to class. When I arrived that evening, I felt much worse. I made a tough decision to leave the class upon arriving, as I knew that I might pass my illness on to the other students and the instructor. As a student therapist, becoming aware of illnesses and contraindications to massage will be an invaluable tool to my work.

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Massage Pathology Education Consulting, comment

May 20, 2009

Yes, we provide consultations regarding online Massage Pathology Education. Some of the topics are
1. Starting an online Massage Pathology course.
2. Advertising
3. Keeping students active
4. Preparing students for licensing and certification examination

Original Post:
May 18, 2009
Title: Massage Pathology Education Consulting
Will your company provide consultations regarding Massage Pathology Education?

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Can I enroll in your massage pathology course immediately? (comment)

May 18, 2009

Yes, you can immediately start our online Massage Pathology course after enrolling.
Go to our home page http://massage-pathology-chronicles.com
Go to the right side of the page.
Find Online Massage Pathology Course.
Click on the link “Online and Instructor-Led Massage Pathology Course.”
Then follow the instructions for enrolling.
If you have any difficulties, you may email us admin@healthcare-online-education.com

Original Post:
May 11, 2009
Title: Can I enroll in your massage pathology course immediately?
Can I enroll in your massage pathology course immediately? I want to
take the National Certification Board for Therapeutic Massage &
Bodywork examination as soon as possible.

Original Post:
April 22, 2009
The tuition and procedure to enroll can be found in the link on the
lower right-hand section of this page. The link contains the word
“Course.”

Original Post:
April 10, 2009
What is the tuition and procedure to enroll in your Massage Pathology course?

Original Post:
April 9, 2009
Our
course is 45 Contact Hours (3 Semester Credits). We provide a completed
“Verification of Education Form” and/or notarized copy of your
certification of completion and/or an official school transcript. Click
on the link “Online and Instructor-Led Massage Pathology Course” on the
right side of this page. The link is under the sub-heading “Online
Massage Pathology Course.”

Original Post:
April 2, 2009
Does
your Massage Pathology course fulfill the requirements of the National
Certification Board for Therapeutic Massage & Bodywork (NCBTMB) to
take the National Certification Examination for Therapeutic Massage and
Bodywork (NCETMB) and the National Certification Examination for
Therapeutic Massage (NCETM)?

Does your Massage Pathology course
fulfill the requirements of the Federation of State Massage Therapy
Boards to take the Massage & Bodywork Licensing Examination (MBLEx)?

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Cerebrovascular Disease

May 18, 2009

Cerebrovascular Disease is common in the population of patients that I work with. Most of my patients that have a history of a CVA are still highly functioning. They do need assistance with their activities of daily living but sometimes this is usually due to more than the history of the CVA. According to Robbins and Cotran, Cerebrovascular Disease is the third leading cause of death in the United States. Knowing the signs and symptoms of a stroke are important because some people are not aware that they are having or have had a stroke. Helping our patients to be aware of changes in vision, trouble speaking, and weakness on the left or right sides of the body are just a few obvious signs of a possible stroke. I have seen patients surprised that they have had a stroke when they went to the hospital after waiting for the above symptoms to worsen. Massage therapy along with physical and occupational therapies are most often a part of rehabilitation depending on the severity of the stroke. Therapy with the doctor’s approval is important so that the patient can return to their highest level of functioning. Although the physical condition of the patient may change after a stroke, there are also some emotional and psychological issues that can occur. If the functioning of a patient has greatly changed we may need to make a referral for counseling. Depression can occur if the patient has severe damage from a stroke such as not being able to walk anymore. We need to make appropriate referrals to help the patient in all aspects of their daily functioning.

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Massage Pathology Education Consulting

May 18, 2009

Will your company provide consultations regarding Massage Pathology Education?

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Massage and After-Effects of Cancer Surgery

May 17, 2009

One of my clients was diagnosed with cancer of the right ovary after having suffered for more than 5 years with heavy bleeding during her periods. She was 57 and had not yet had menopause, and finally it was discovered she had a small tumor on the ovary. The doctor who performed the surgery removed the tumor and both ovaries, and she removed the uterus and all the lymph nodes in the inguinal area. My client had a very difficult time recovering her strength after this surgery, and began going to treatment to a specialist in lymphodema, as one of her legs remained continually swollen after the surgery. This client did not come to see me until roughly 3 months after the surgery. The right leg was actually still swollen from the lymphodema, and so it was very painful for her to lay either supine or prone for very long. We used side-posture massage, with very light, gentle flowing strokes and gentle effleurage for relaxation and continued restoration of the body’s circulation without forcing blood or lymph flow. It has taken almost a year for her to regain her strength, and she still goes to therapy with a lymphodema specialist, although she has been able to reduce the frequency of those visits to monthly. She still wears a bandage on that leg if she has to stand for any length of time, and she still loves her weekly massages and is finally able to get her full-body massage as she can now lay prone or supine with ease.

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